Archives for Equality

Working together

In Scotland there is a movement of disabled people and their organisations, including Access Panels, which aim to work together to overcome these barriers. They also aim to help service providers to get better at what they do. There are many laws, regulations, policies and standards which aim to ensure that service providers work to remove these barriers but there are gaps in the law and what duties there are do not always get met. Access Panels are groups of disabled people who can help service providers get better at meeting their duties and working to ensure that all disabled
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The basic rights of independent living

Human rights and rights to independent living mean that disabled people should have access to the right support and practical assistance, at the right time, in order to participate in society. This support includes things like access to education and employment, accessible and adapted housing, technical aids, communication support, information, advocacy, personal assistance and full access to transport and the built environment and rights to equal citizenship and to participate in society.
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The Scottish Government’s Commitment to Independent Living

The Scottish Government is committed to delivering equality and human rights for disabled people across Scotland by addressing independent living. The rights to independent living are enshrined within the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD), the Human Rights Act 1998, and the Equality Act 2010. The UNCRPD is an international human rights agreement written by and for disabled people. It states that disabled people have and should enjoy the same human rights as everyone else. Scotland’s approach to implementing the Convention complements the Scottish Government’s existing work to promote disability equality and independent living for
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Independent Living

Independent Living is a right shared by everyone in Scotland. It is a legal right and a human right. It means we are all entitled to have choice, control, dignity and freedom over our own lives so that we can participate in society as equal citizens. That means disabled people and those with long-term conditions too. However, many disabled people find it difficult or impossible to participate fully in society. Whether in learning, working, volunteering, taking part in politics or sport many disabled people are denied access to opportunities or do not achieve the same results as other people who
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Equality Act 2010

The Equality Act came into force on 1 October 2010. The Equality Act brings together over 116 separate pieces of legislation into one single Act. Combined, they make up a Act that provides a legal framework to protect the rights of individuals and advance equality of opportunity for all. The Act simplifies, strengthens and harmonises legislation to provide Britain with a discrimination law which protects individuals from unfair treatment and promotes a fair and more equal society. The nine main pieces of legislation that have merged are: the Equal Pay Act 1970 the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 the Race Relations
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United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD)

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is an international human rights agreement written by and for disabled people. It is for people who have a long-term physical, mental, learning or sensory impairment who may face barriers to participating equally in society. The Convention places obligations on the UK and Scottish Governments to take steps to make sure disabled people enjoy their human rights in the same way as others. Disabled people and the Commissions play an important role to protect, promote and monitor the implementation of these rights. If you, your family members or friends
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Social Model

The Social Model has been developed by disabled people in response to the Medical Model and the impact this has on their daily lives. Under the Social Model, disability is caused by the society in which we live and is not the ‘fault’ of an individual disabled person, or an inevitable consequence of their limitations. Disability is the product of the physical, organisational and attitudinal barriers present within society, which lead to discrimination. The removal of discrimination requires a change of approach and thinking in the way in which society is organised. The Social Model takes account of disabled people
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Models of Disability

Definitions and the language used are important because they form the basis of models. Models are not scientific or philosophical theories or ideologies. They are merely ways of looking at things or situations. There are two predominant models of disability commonly in use in the UK; the Medical Model and the Social Model.
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Medical Model

Under the Medical Model, disabled people are defined by their illness or medical condition. They are disempowered: medical diagnoses are used to regulate and control access to social benefits, housing, education, leisure and employment. The Medical Model promotes the views of a disabled person as dependent and needing to be cured or cared for, and it justifies the way in which disabled people have been systematically excluded from society. Control resides firmly with professionals. Choices for the individual are limited to the options provided and approved by the ‘helping’ expert. The Medical Model is sometimes known as the ‘individual model’
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