Archives for News and Blog

Blog: The Scottish Commission for Learning Disability

The Scottish Commission for Learning Disability The Scottish Commission for Learning Disability –www.scld.org.uk is excited to announce that Scotland’s Learning Disability Week 2019 – www.scld.org.uk/learning-disability-week-2019 will take place from Monday 13th – Sunday 19th May. This year’s theme is ‘community’ – whoever we are and where ever in Scotland we live, we can all be part of a community. SCLD want to celebrate the contribution and involvement of people with learning disabilities in communities all over Scotland and are asking people, groups and communities to get involved by organising their own ‘Communi-Tea Party’. You can order a ‘Get Involved’ pack
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Blog: Ideas for Ears – Hearing Access – What it is

Ideas for Ears: Hearing Access – what it is Hearing access recognises the fundamental importance of people being able to chat, discuss and follow the spoken word.  It is about making hearing and following conversation and audible information more possible for more people. It is crucial for ensuring equality, diversity and inclusion. The practical application of hearing access encompasses:   provision of the right audio equipment (PA systems, hearing loops, microphones) and ensuring they are set up and used appropriately and effectively creation of environments where noise and acoustics are managed so noise levels don’t build and sound doesn’t echo and
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Blog: Dyslexia Scotland

Dyslexia Scotland It is estimated that 1 in 10 people has dyslexia.  Dyslexia exists in all cultures and across the range of abilities and backgrounds. Dyslexia often runs in the family. There is no ‘cure’ but lots of practical things can help overcome some of the barriers it presents. Dyslexia is a learning ‘difference’, which means that the brain can approach things in a different way to other people. Dyslexia can affect the way people communicate, and is different for everyone. It is not just about reading and writing and it has nothing to do with intelligence. Dyslexia is classed
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Blog: British Deaf Association Scotland

Blog: British Deaf Association Scotland The British Deaf Association (BDA) stands for Deaf Equality, Access, and Freedom of Choice. It is important to the BDA that Deaf people should have the right to choose to sign or speak or both without sanction and without obstacles. Equality means that Deaf people are able to access information and support in their preferred language, and have the same opportunities to achieve the same life outcomes as hearing people. Recognition of British and Irish Sign Languages in legislation is essential to raising awareness, recognition and respect to achieve equality of access and opportunity for Deaf people. We
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Improve your learning…

Listed below are training courses specifically designed to improve areas in developing awareness and understanding in Inclusive Communications.  
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Disability Equality Scotland scoops prize celebrating Inclusive Communication

Disability Equality Scotland scoops prize celebrating Inclusive Communication Disability Equality Scotland is celebrating its recent success at the Sensory and Equality Awards 2019, held in Glasgow on Friday 15 March 2019.     The Awards followed a successful conference held jointly by deafscotland and Disability Equality Scotland to showcase inclusive communication and ensuring that communication really is for all. We were runner-up in the category ‘Multi-sensory and inclusive communication approach to communication in Scotland’ which was sponsored by STV Signpost. Scottish Parliament Public Information and Resources won the category. We were acknowledged for our work in promoting inclusive communication.  As hosts
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1st Anniversary of AAC legislation #NowHearMe

1st Anniversary of AAC legislation #NowHearMe 19 March 2019 marks the 1st year anniversary of the commencement of legislation to provide communication equipment and support in using that equipment. The introduction of this equipment has helped children and adults, from all care groups, who have lost their voice or have difficulty speaking. The responsibility to deliver the duty is held by Health Boards. What’s happened this year? To support delivery of the legislative duty a suite of tools have been developed: Guidance on the Provision of Communication Equipment and Support in using that equipment – this provides practical information on the
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Course: Want to learn BSL?

Our popular Voices Off Cafe is now going to be open in the evening from 11th March! Sessions will run from 6:30pm to 7:30pm every week at Forth Valley Sensory Centre, Redbrae Rd, Camelon, Falkirk FK1 4DD. With so many people wanting to learn BSL we have managed to secure support from the local See Hear Fund to put on evening sessions. This is not an acredited course and does not lead to a certificate, but it is a fun, relaxed and social occasion where you can learn BSL from the experts, real deaf people and pick up a new skill. BSL
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Calmac Making Connections Adrossan

Calmac Making Connections Adrossan Many journeys rely on us changing from one type of transport to another, navigating the spaces between services, where one ‘stops’ and another ‘starts’. But even short transfers have potential barriers – crossing a busy street, poor lighting, difficulty finding a place to sit down and rest. But who’s responsible for the quality and accessibility of the connection? And what’s the best way for everyone concerned to work together to improve it? ‘Making Connections’ will bring disabled people together with transport operator staff and other professionals to experience and assess journey connections between rail and ferry
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News: ScotRail supports schoolgirl’s sign

ScotRail supports schoolgirl’s sign ScotRail has become the latest organisation to support a schoolgirl’s campaign to raise awareness of ‘ invisible’ disabilities . The train operator has installed ‘Grace’s Sign’ at accessible toilets in its stations across Scotland. Grace’s Sign is a bathroom sign that includes both a person in a wheelchair and a standing person with a heart, symbolising people with invisible conditions. Thirteen-year-old Grace Warnock, who has Crohn’s Disease, came up with the idea for a more inclusive sign after facing criticism from strangers when she used accessible toilets. The innovative signs can also be found at other
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