Monthly Archives May 2016

Improve your learning…

Listed below are training courses specifically designed to improve areas in developing awareness and understanding in Inclusive Communications.  
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Share your experience…

The blogs below have been written from personal experience. The Case Studies are about the experiences of disabled employees and also employers employing a disabled person. Please contact us to share your own story, to help others understand the challenges and how to overcome them.
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Back to basics : what is a disability?

According to the Equality Act 2010  you are disabled if you ‘have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities’. It’s actually not quite as clear cut as that due to different rules around fluctuating and long-term conditions (eg., arthritis) but this is currently the wording used to inform decision-making at a policy level.  This covers many endogenous, mental health, developmental, congenital and trauma related disorders and conditions, from a learning disability to depression; MS to heart failure; a hearing impairment to Crones Disease. For many employers,
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Disability in the Marketplace

1 in 5 people in Scotland are disabled. That’s around one million people.  Whether you are a business, a charity or in the public sector, you will be working with, selling to or supporting disabled people.
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Top ten tips: Working with someone with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Aspergers

Autism Spectrum Disorder affects different people in different ways and to varying degrees. This means that one cannot make an assumption about the needs of any individual with ASD. A person with high-functioning Autism or Aspergers may suffer high anxiety in certain situations, or have difficulty with certain social interactions, or may simply thrive in a well structured environment. The following points are not recommendations for a ‘typical’ person with autism, as no such person exists. However, these suggestions are good for any working environment, but may be of particular help to someone on the Autism Spectrum or with Aspergers
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Top ten tips: Speaking to someone with a hearing impairment

There is no need for guesswork! Ask the person you are speaking to how they would like to communicate. Do not assume that a deaf person uses BSL or lipreads. Ask where they would like to sit, what is needed for them to be fully included in the conversation. If the deaf person has an interpreter with them, your conversation must always be directed at the person you are talking to, not the interpreter. If the deaf person lip reads, speak normally, but do avoid covering your mouth, eating or chewing gum whilst speaking. Always look directly at the deaf
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Case Study: Access for all – it’s all of our business!

In the 2011 census around 1 million people living in Scotland reported that their day-to-day activities were limited by a long-term health problem or disability. This means that the current ‘Access All Areas’ campaign being led by the Largs and Millport News affects a significant number of people. Then remember that this campaign is also aimed at older people and parents with push chairs. That adds a few more people who might benefit. If we then consider that communication access is just as important as physical access, adding people with communication support needs means even more people benefit from this campaign.
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